Fontana Table Lamp
Object

Designed in 1954 by the famous French Master glassmaker and decorator Max Ingrand, this lamp was originally named 1853 and, at a later time, Fontana, in homage to the company of which the Master was Artistic Director for a decade. For design enthusiasts and connoisseurs of the brand’s history, 1853 still remains as a sort of nickname.The first symbol of timeless object of design, still today best seller and evergreen design icon, Fontana is the abat-jour par excellence. The peculiarity of Fontana is its multiple light sources: both the base and the lampshade contain one or more. The larger version also allows indirect lighting, thanks to an additional source that projects a beam of indirect light upwards. The differentiated light sources make it possible to satisfy different lighting needs: from a soft, relaxing glow to a sharp beam for reading to suggestive ambient light. Available also with Led light sources. A fabulous lamp in frosted white blown glass, already riedited in a total black variant, it is now proposed in a colored and brand new version – light grey and purple amethyst – to reinforce the contemporaneity of the project. “Light and colour are centrainly the most specific elements in nature. With them we have RELIEF, MOTION, LIFE” stated Max Ingrand. “Actually the history of architecture tells us what was the role of illuminated, opaque, translucent colour in interior and exterior architecture (…)Light was no longer just a means to breathe life into colour but became a means to breathe life into an entire architecture.”

MATERIALS
Glass, Galvanised Metal

COLORS
Small, Medium: Violet, Black, White, Brass/White, Brass/Black
Large: Black, White, Light Grey

DIMENSIONS
Small: H34cmx ø20cm
Medium: H53cm x ø32cm
Large: H78cm x ø47cm

Designer
In 1881 Luigi Fontana starts his business in Milan, manufacturing float glass for the construction industry. As the century draws to a close, the company is producing refined bespoke and one-off glass furnishing accessories.Gio Ponti, former founding editor of Domus magazine, is invited to take over the company’s art direction in 1931. An eclectic character who is a key player in the cultural ferment of that period, Ponti is also one of the founders of ADI (the Italian Industrial Design Association). He curates the Milan Triennale events on various occasions, lectures at the Milan Polytechnic, and designs both public and private buildings, furnishings and objects that become part of the history of architecture and design.Several of the pieces he designs for FontanaArte are still in production, including the 0024, Bilia, Pirellina, and Pirellone lamps, and the Tavolino 1932 coffee table.
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